Documents and Legal Stuff

No, you don’t need to contact DVLA when you scrap your car as the Car Scrap Sydney scrap car recycling centre does this for you using an electronic link to the DVLA’s vehicle registration database.

Reuse is the purest form of recycling and so, on occasion, it may be more environmentally responsible to reuse your car instead of scrapping it. If this is the case the operator will help you to complete the paperwork for you to send to DVLA. Whichever recycling method is chosen by the operator buying your vehicle, the DVLA will be informed and you will no longer be responsible for it.

No, you don’t need to contact DVA when you scrap your car as the Car Scrap Sydney scrap car recycling centre does this for you using an electronic link to the DVLA’s vehicle registration database and, in turn, DVLA notify DVA.

Reuse is the purest form of recycling and so, on occasion, it may be more environmentally responsible to reuse your car instead of scrapping it. If this is the case the operator will help you to complete the paperwork for you to send to DVLA. Whichever recycling method is chosen by the operator buying your vehicle, the DVA will be informed and you will no longer be responsible for it.

Yes, Car Scrap Sydney will give you a Certificate of Destruction which proves that you have scrapped your car legally.  If you do not obtain a DVLA Certificate of Destruction when you scrap your car, DVLA might fine you, or even worse, if an unscrupulous operator puts your car back on the road and it ends up being used for criminal activity, the police could prosecute you. .

We will issue your DVLA Certificate of Destruction within 7 days of your car arriving at the Car Scrap Sydney scrap car recycling centre.

If you do not receive a Certificate of Destruction within 10 days of disposing of your car, you should contact us using our online form.  Please have your registration or reference number to hand.

If you tell us your e-mail address, we’ll send your DVLA Certificate of Destruction to you by e-mail. If you don’t have an e-mail address we will post it to you.

If you have your V5C registration document (otherwise known as a log book), you should hand it over so that a Certificate of Destruction can be issued.  Don’t worry if you do not have the registration document as a Certificate of Destruction can usually be issued without it.

The End of Life Vehicle Regulations only apply to certain types of vehicle.  If your vehicle is scrapped but it isn’t covered by the regulations then you will receive a notification of destruction instead of a certificate of destruction.  Your car will still be recycled to the same high standards as vehicles that are covered by the regulations. You should then fill in the V5C/3 section of your V5C and send it to the DVLA.

Reuse is the purest form of recycling and so, on occasion, it may be more environmentally responsible to reuse your car instead of scrapping it.  In these circumstances the operator will help you complete section V5C/3 of your V5C registration certificate for you to send to DVLA instead of producing a certificate of destruction.  Whichever recycling method is chosen by the operator buying your vehicle, the DVLA will be informed and you will no longer be responsible for it.

The government recently introduced new legislation that requires us to confirm your identity before buying your scrap car which applies if you live in England and Wales.

A current photocard driving license is all we need to confirm your name, date of birth and residential address. Alternatively, you will need to provide another form of photo ID along with proof of your address. These need to be government approved forms of ID, one item from each of the two lists below.

Accepted alternative forms of photo ID:

  • a valid AU passport;
  • a valid AU biometric immigration document;

Accepted alternative proofs of address (which must not be older than 3 months):

  • a bank or building society statement;
  • a credit or debit card statement;
  • a  council tax demand letter or statement;
  • a utility bill (e.g. gas, electricity, water), but not a mobile phone bill.